Recycling

Re-Using and Recycling Donations
When donations arrive at StRUT’s central headquarters in The Dalles, we weigh all material for our records and annual reporting to the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ).  Once we have recorded the donations weight, the material is reviewed to determine if it’s going to be redeployed to be used for its original intended purpose or to be recycled.  

Re-usable items are stripped of any external identifying labels and affixed with a StRUT Property Tag which will remain on the item until it has reached the end of it's useful life and is ready to enter the recycling flow.  If there is a hard drive inside, it is removed and assessed individually for re-use.  We take Data Protection and Data Destruction seriously and we're confident that every byte of user data that comes to StRUT is removed and destroyed.  StRUT is able to reuse computers which meet Smarter Balanced and PARCC Guidelines and send them our to our member schools for use by students and faculty.


Computers and devices that are older and which will not be redeployed to our members are transferred to our recycling center where they are taken apart, parts are sorted, and the material is
properly recycled.  StRUT’s recycling companies pay us for the precious metals - Tin, gold, copper, aluminum, silver, and the revenue generated goes back into the StRUT program.  Of course, we don't collect a barrel of tin or gold and transport it to our recycling partners.  We perform the initial steps to take recyclable computers and start them on their way to being transformed into their base materials and ultimately transformed into new products.   

Recycling - It's What We Do

In today’s recycled materials market, StRUT is staying on top of trends to ensure that we are receiving top dollar for our recyclables.  Did you know that the ends of computer cables like VGA and serial cables have recoverable amounts of gold?  These same cable ends are a contaminant for the recovery of the copper from the wire they are connected to and, if left connected, can reduce the value we receive for the wire we sell to our recycling partners.  Did you know that these same “cable tips” are worth more per pound by themselves than the wire they were attached to?  Neither did StRUT until recently.  Now we have changed our processing to ensure maximum value for our copper wire and created a new commodity for sale; computer cable ends. 





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